091. Smart Money Mamas

Podcast

Chelsea Brennan, the founder of Smart Money Mamas, is an ex-hedge fund manager turned financial educator. She joins The 411k to talk about money – specifically how to talk about money with kids.

Kids are always watching! Even without talking about money, they pick up money habits from those around them – especially parents. Chelsea and Katherine share how their money mindset changed when they had children and how their perspectives have shifted as their families has grown.

Whether you are a mom or hope to one day start a family, you won’t want to miss out on these healthy money habits!

090. Money & Happiness

Podcast

We talk a lot on the show about how emotional money can be and we hear a lot about money shame, guilt, and grief. But today we want to talk about happiness! Melissa Leong, author of Happy Go Money, joins The 411k to talk about how happiness and money are intertwined.

Melissa challenges Katie, Katherine and the audience to answer two questions…

(1) On a scale of 1 to 10, how happy are you right now? (10 being the happiest)

(2) How much money would you need to become a 10?

Tune in to hear what research shows about these questions!

088. Talking Money with Jason Tartick

Podcast
Jason Tartick joins The 411k to share some money stories that are featured in his new book, The Restart Roadmap. You may know Jason from his time on The Bachelorette, but he also has a successful career starting in corporate banking and building as an entreprenuer. Now is a good time to reset, restart and talk money!

Interested in more from Jason? Check out our 411k bookclub for more information on his book, The Restart Roadmap.

081. First Generation Investors

Podcast

Jully-Alma Taveras also known online as Investing Latina, is a Plutus Award-winning bilingual (spanish) personal finance expert. She is a Dominican Republic-born immigrant living in New York that went from being a shopaholic to a smart spender and diligent investor. In this episode, we discuss the pressure of being the first in your family to invest and how to talk money with friends and family.

Wedding Guest Budgets

Relationships, Weddings

We are so happy to see our friends get engaged and we are honored to be invited to celebrate their special day! It’s even better when we can do so without going into debt to do so. Therefore, we need to get a little more clear one what to budget for.

How much are we talking about?

In 2014, an American Express survey found that the average guest spent approximately $592 per wedding and in 2016, the average increased to $888 per wedding. This is obviously dependent on a number of factors. According to The Knot, guests attending a local wedding spent approximately $185, guests who drove out of town spent approximately $600, and guests who flew to a wedding reported an average spend of $1,440.  The average total spent also varies whether you are in the bridal party! If you are in the wedding, the average is well over $1,000. Now imagine getting invited to 3-5 weddings in one year all across the country…

Wait seriously? Yep, that checked out. In 2018, Katie attended two weddings as a guest. Between bachelorettes, bridal showers, travel, hotels, food, dresses, and gifts, Katie spent $681 and $746 on each wedding. Then in 2021, Katie was a bridesmaid in two weddings which added up to over $1,135 each. But these are just examples.

How can I keep costs down?

  1. Talk to your friends and ask them about their expectations. Do they expect you to travel for every event with a top of the line registry gift? Are they requiring hair and makeup for everyone? Are they flexible with the dress costs? What costs are they paying for?

2. Use travel points, miles and cash back available to you to cover expenses. I love saving my credit card points to get gift cards as wedding gifts for friends. Travel can be something that really gets pricey so if that means not staying in the room block to say a couple hundred dollars, that might be worth it!

3. Be thrifty! Don’t be afraid to shop used dresses or re-sell your dress on Poshmark or any other resale market.

4. Start a sinking fund! Set a budget and start planning for it early. If you know that the wedding next year is going to cost you $1,100, start putting $100 away each month now.

5. Be honest with yourself and your friends! Don’t lie to yourself. You might not be able to fit 5 weddings into your budget. So be honest with yourself and your friends about what you can and can not commit to. Maybe you can only really commit to the wedding day but will not be able to travel for the engagement party, bachelorette and shower.

5. Say ‘No.’ This is the hardest of them all but it’s okay to say no to a wedding invitation or any other event. Don’t go broke trying to keep up with someone else. Send a nice gift to the bachelorette if you can’t attend or ask to contribute in other ways to the wedding or shower. A nice gesture will save face and money in your bank. If they are a real friend, they will understand. Some times this is a secret blessing to the bride and groom who are trying to keep their own costs down.

Managing Money & Grief

Relationships

Not all money conversations are romantic. “How do you want to die?” is one of the most important and costly conversations Americans aren’t having. Don’t wait to ask the tough questions until the end! It can be hard to talk about death with a loved one but we need to be talking about how to prepare for death before it happens.

Where do we even start? Don’t just bring it up out of the blue. Make sure they know it’s coming so they can come to the table prepared. “When you have time, I’d like to seriously discuss our end-of-life options.”

Start with your feelings and why this is an important conversation. There is no right way to feel so they won’t feel defensive if you come at the conversation from the heart. “I worry about not being prepared in case of the unexpected and I want to ensure we respect your wishes.”

Ask questions and listen to learn! Don’t tell them their plan or offer solutions at the start. Be curious about their plan and then ask if you can create a plan together.

  1. What kind of end of life care do you want?
  2. Do you want a funeral?
  3. Do you have life insurance?
  4. Should we sell the house?
  5. Where is your will?
  6. What accounts do you have and where?
  7. Have you updated your beneficiaries?

These are incredibly tough questions but these are the questions we need to be thinking about for ourselves and asking our loved ones. These answers have big financial implications and the earlier you talk about it, the better you can prepare for a more sustainable grief process. Don’t let your grief process be compounded by debt and financial loss. The more we talk about difficult things, the more you can honor your loved one’s wishes and make unexpected circumstances easier to manage.

Check out our episode with Lisa Keefauver, in which she shared how she managed the unexpected loss of the love of her life and how we can make these conversations less taboo.

074. Next Generation Investor

Podcast
Kelly Lannan, Vice President of Personal Investing at Fidelity Investments, join The 411k to discuss the next generation of investors. Millennials and Gen Z are doing things differently than those generations before them – getting married later, renting longer, having families later, etc. These generations do not subscribe do the same timeline as their parents or grandparents. However, it’s critical to not put off investing! Kelly Lannan is responsible for educating and inspiring young adults to get more engaged with their finances.

073. Scrappy Investing with Amanda Holden

Podcast

Amanda Holden, aka Dumpster Doggy, joins The 411k to get real about investing. Starting at 21, everyone is telling you to start putting money into a retirement account. Yes, we know that we are in a retirement crisis but there is so much more that we can learn about how to make our investments work for us. Amanda makes money fun and relatable so tune in to learn more about how to better understand how investing works.

053. Money in Relationships with Meredith Goldstein (2019)

Podcast

VALENTINES DAY SPECIAL! We are bringing back this 2019 episode to highlight one of our favorite conversations about money and relationships. We talk with Meredith Goldstein, author and advice columnist for the Boston Globe’s Love Letters. Our conversation with Meredith is the genesis for one of our favorite fun questions – “brand name vs generic” which is a fun game you can play with your partner this weekend. This episode was one of our original episodes so please forgive the fact that we are all sitting in Katie’s living room recording this episode without fancy microphones or sound editing.

045. This Girl is on FIRE

Podcast

Catie is a single graphic designer hustling to retire early by 35. She runs Millennial Money Honey where she shares her adventure to financial independence inspiring others to start their own journey. Catie joins us to talk about FIRE – Financial Independence, Retire Early. She’s sharing tips and tricks that she is using to save money for a work-optional future.